The Photographers’ Gallery – London

Located between Soho and Fitzrovia this is a great little stop for tourists like myself who can’t commit to a full day in one of the big museums but still wants to see something interesting and artistic.

“The Photographers’ Gallery is the largest public gallery in London dedicated to photography. From the latest emerging talent, to historical archives and established artists, we’re the place to see photography in all its forms.”

Free for visitors until 1pm, and then only £3, the museum sits on 5 floors, 3 of which house the exhibits.  On the ground floor is a cute cafe, also worthwhile for a visit.

When I was there I stumbled across “Made You Look – Dandyism and Black Masculinity” as well as photographs by fashion photography icon Terence Donovan.

Check their website for current exhibits and definitely pay it a visit when in London.

The Photographers’ Gallery, 16 – 18 Ramillies St, London W1F 7LW  +44 (020) 7087 9300

Mon – Sat 10.00 – 18.00, Thu 10.00 – 20.00 during exhibitions, Sun 11.00 – 18.00


Left Luggage in London: Free Yourself!

Are you a curious and adventurous traveler who wants to immerse yourself in the rich culture and unique lifestyle of the places you visit? Cross-Pollinate has dozens of privately owned apartments in the London metro area from which to choose. Staying at a self-catered vacation property is an excellent way to experience what life is really like for a native Londoner.

Few properties have staffed reception areas, so they’re generally unable to provide left luggage service before check-in time or after check out. In a big metropolis like London, wherever can you stash your bags?

Well, you’re in luck! We’ve come across a company called Excess Baggage Company that offers over 14 locations (10 of them are near major transportation hubs) where you can safely and affordably drop your heavy, bulky or valuable items while you enjoy the sights of the city unencumbered.

It’s really pretty easy: Drop your suitcases as early as 7:00am and pick them up as late as 11:00pm. Short- and long-term storage is available, as is 24-hour closed circuit TV, full security screening and baggage shipping/delivery. You can even purchase new luggage and travel accessories.

In addition, if you opt for using their convenient online/pre-booking system, you’ll be able to take advantage of their VIP priority handling lanes – just go straight to the counter and deposit your bags…no waiting.

Excess Baggage Company outlets are sprinkled along Great Britain’s national rail network that links London to surrounding UK airports, as well as other European destinations.

Now you can sightsee London freely and without worry!

Excess Baggage Company
Hours: 7:00am – 11:00pm
London area locations: London Heathrow Airport, London Gatwick Airport, North Terminal (The Avenue), South Terminal (Main Concourse), Charing Cross Station, Euston Station, King’s Cross Station, Liverpool Street Station, Paddington Station, St Pancras International, Birmingham New Street, Liverpool Lime Street Station, Victoria Station and Waterloo Station.

35% off Select London Flats for February

For the month of February, check out the following flats offering a 35% discount!

The Framery Flat 1 - £125/night - £82/night (sleeps up to 3 people)

The Framery Flat 2 - £125/night - £82/night (sleeps up to 3 people)

The Framery Flat 3 - £125/night - £82/night (sleeps up to 3 people)

The Framery Flat 4 - £159/night - £104/night (sleeps up to 3 people)

The Framery Flat 5 - £142/night - £93/night (sleeps up to 2 people)

The Framery Flat 6 - £142/night - £93/night (sleeps up to 2 people)

The Framery Flat 7 - £142/night - £93/night (sleeps up to 2 people)

Shoreditch 1-bedroom Flat - £165/night - £98/night (sleeps up to 3 people)

Regent’s Canal 3-bedroom - £278/night - £180/night (sleeps up 6 people)

Apartment Angel - £182/night - £119/night (sleeps up to 4 people)

The Framery Loft - £300/night - £195/night (sleeps up to 8 people)


To see all our London properties, click here.



Alternative London – Street Art Tour and Graffiti Workshop

Both my daughter and I have been to London before.  We’ve seen Big Ben and St. Paul’s Cathedral, have visited the Tate Modern, and have walked the Portobello Road market.  We had a number of nights in London this trip, just her and I, and were looking for something different – something we could do together, and couldn’t do at home.

We were happy to find out about Alternative London and get off the beaten track into one of my favorite neighborhoods,  Shoreditch.  We decided on this particular tour and workshop because we liked the idea of doing and not just seeing.  We wanted to be exposed to something cultural, but also to create something.  Extra points went to the fact that it was one of the most affordable things we did on our trip (£25 per person for a 4/5 hour tour and workshop).

Organized by Alternative London, a local artist’s cooperative who do a variety of artistic tours and workshops – art walks on the streets and in local galleries, as well as bike tours and food/pub crawls.  We booked on-line through their website for an 11am Saturday tour with a meeting point by the Old Street tube station on the Northern Line – easy to get to from anywhere in London (took us about 20 minutes from Soho).

Our guide, Rae, an artist/skater who is clearly passionate and deeply involved in the local art scene, told us all about the history of graffiti and street art, and the differences between the two, in an intelligent, animated, and entertaining way.  She touched on the political and the economic messages without any hint of preachiness.  She was thought provoking and light hearted at these same time.  She was great with her subject, but also great at connecting to all of us on the walk, something that not all guides do well.

After the walk, we took a short break to get something eat, and then after a brief lesson on stencil making, retired to their double decker art bus to get started making our own.

She then gave us a demo of different techniques for spray painting and we took turns on a few boards outside before working on own stencils.

Those of us who wanted, had the option of buying a canvas bag or t-shirt for a few extra pounds, to paint our stencil on.

London  has a lot to offer and the choice of museums alone can be overwhelming.  If you want to do something that supports the local art scene, gives you a street-eye view of what’s going on, and makes you really feel the pulse of the East Side, this is a great, affordable thing to do.

Plus, you get to take home your own handmade, one-of-a-kind souvenir.

Alternative London
The Alternative London Bus
1-3 Rivington St

London to Paris on the Eurostar

by Jessica Infantino Trumble

Crossing the English Channel is easier than you may think thanks to Eurostar’s high-speed trains, which began service between the UK and Continental Europe more than 20 years ago. In general, trains are a quintessential part of European travel and can often be more reliable and economical than flying. So if you want to enjoy breakfast in London and lunch in Paris, the Eurostar is a good option to maximize your time while minimizing stress and hassle. Here’s what you need to know.


Eurostar tickets go on sale 120 days in advance and become more expensive the closer it gets to the departure date. So book early, or as soon as you know your travel plans, to ensure you can travel on the day you want at the best price. You can purchase tickets online through Eurostar’s website to print out at home or pick up at the station (select your country at the top of the page to pay in your currency), or you can book through third party sites like Rail Europe  to have paper tickets shipped in advance of your trip. It’s important to note that there is an hour time difference between London and Paris, so keep that in mind when buying tickets.


The first Eurostar trains ran between Waterloo in South London and Gare du Nord in Paris.

However, today trains use London’s St. Pancras International following the completion of its £800 million renovation in 2007. Dating back to 1868, the station’s glass and steel train shed interior has been beautiful restored and passengers now have access to amenities ranging from free Wi-Fi to the longest champagne bar in Europe. There are also plans for Paris’ 150-year-old Gare du Nord, which first opened in 1864, to undergo a €48 million facelift in the future.

Pre-Boarding Experience

You need to check in for Eurostar trains at least 30 minutes in advance, but don’t worry it’s a much more low-key process than what you would experience at the airport. Lines are shorter, you don’t have to check your bags and you can leave your shoes on. At St. Pancras station there is plenty of signage directing you where to go. Scan your ticket at the automated check-in gates, quickly pass through x-ray screening and passport control and then sit back and relax in the lounge area. Once your track is announced (generally about 15 minutes before departure), make your way up to the escalators to the platform.

Onboard Experience

The journey between London and Paris takes less than 2 1/2 hours on the Eurostar, which reaches a top speed of 300 kilometers per hour (186 mph). After you settle into your rather roomy seat (as compared to airline standards), gaze out the window and watch the English countryside give way to darkness as you enter the English Channel Tunnel (or the “Chunnel” for short). Surprisingly, this underwater part of the trip is only about 20 minutes. Note that not all trains are direct, so check the timetable carefully before making your reservation. You also have the choice between 3 classes – Standard, Standard Premier and Business Premier – the latter 2 of which offer more amenities like power outlets and regionally-inspired meals, so choose accordingly if this is important to you. All Eurostar trains are non-smoking and include 2 buffet cars with drinks and snacks for purchase regardless of class.


The biggest benefit over flying is that the Eurostar takes you from city center to city center, so you can hop off the train and hit the ground running. Taxis and public transportation are readily available at both train stations. In Paris, Gare du Nord is a major hub for regional RER lines (which connects to Charles de Gaulle airport) and D, metro lines 4 and 5, as well as several other suburban and high-speed trains heading north. St. Pancras in London connects with the King’s Cross St. Pancras Underground station (which serves the Circle, Hammersmith and City, Metropolitan, Northern, Piccadilly and Victoria tube lines) and several other train lines including both the Heathrow and Gatwick Express trains to the airport.

Other Destinations

In addition to the London-Paris route, the Eurostar also has a train that takes you from London to the Brussels-Midi/Zuid station in about 2 hours with a stop in Lille, France along the way (again, don’t forget about the time zone difference). There is also a direct train from London to Disneyland Paris, perfect for a family daytrip with kids. On weekends in the winter, the Eurostar operates a weekly ski train to the French and Swiss Aps, and there are other seasonal trains to the South of France in the summer, with even more routes coming soon. And even though you’re likely to never run out of things to do in London and Paris (and yes, sitting in a café sipping your beverage of choice is a perfectly acceptable activity), the Eurostar can be your gateway to other parts of Europe. The sky, or rather the rail, is the limit.

Read more of Jessica’s travel tips for London, Paris, and Belgium on her blog Boarding Pass.